All tagged God's word

A Sure-Fire Reason We Don't Read The Bible

If you’ve been a Christian for more than six seconds, you are probably aware of how important it is to be in God’s Word daily. Christians need to read the Bible. Not a big shocker. Despite the common knowledge of this necessity, few things foil Christians more than faithful Bible reading. Yes, we need a time, a place, and a plan. Yes, we need to grow in discipline. But what we should NOT do is neglect the heart of the problem. 

The primary reason we don’t read God’s Word is that we don’t delight in God’s will. 

Psalm 1:1-2 says, “Blessed is the man…[whose] delight is in the law of the LORD and on his law he meditates day and night." The word translated “delight” indicates “extreme pleasure or satisfaction in something.” That something here is God’s law - not just the first five books of the Old Testament, but also His heart, mind and will for all things.  So here’s the big idea:

Why The Psalms Are Like The App Store

I have an app addiction. Anytime I come across an interesting app, I have to download it. Sure, I tend to only use said app for roughly 13 seconds before burying it in a folder somewhere deep within the recesses of my phone, but that’s beside the point. The genius of the “app explosion” is that there is an app for virtually everything you can imagine - money management, tracking calories, reading blogs, tracking tasks - you name it, and "there’s an app for that". 

I think the book of Psalms has a lot in common with the App Store.

Defining God's Revealed Will

Big Idea: God's Will is that we live God's way as revealed in God's Word.

(To listen to the full sermon audio, click here.)

Many Christians have been taught that God’s will is individual and specific, like a bull’s eye that we are to aim for. According to this traditional view, if we can just discover where the center of His will is and put ourselves there, we can be confident of God’s favor and trust that He is controlling every detail.

Some of us are happy with this way of looking at God’s will.

Dismantling a Defective View of God's Will

Big Idea: God's will is that we would live God's way as defined in God's word.

To listen to the full sermon audio, click here.

Few things are more confusing for Christians than trying to understand God’s will for our lives. We keep trying – and failing – to hit the “bull’s eye” we think of as being the center of His will. Why is that? Can we actually know what God's will is or are we looking for something that doesn’t exist (at least not the way we think about it)?

What if our entire understanding of God’s will is defective?

7 Ways To Wind Up Weary

BIG IDEA | Nobody just wakes up weary one day. We wind up weary after an extended time of neglecting the means God has given us to draw our strength from Him.

Galatians 6:9 says, “And let us not grow weary of doing good, for in due season we will reap, if we do not give up.” Despite the clarity of this verse, “weary” is the way I’d describe many of the Christians I know. Understand, when I say “weary” I don’t mean “tired.” A nap will take care of tired. Weariness is a soul fatigue that impacts every facet of life.

The good news is, nobody simply wakes up weary one day. We wind up weary after an extended time of neglecting the means God has given us to draw our strength from Him. In essence, weariness is what happens when we try to be God. 

I’ve written previously on how to get through a season of weariness, but it’s equally important that we identify the behaviors that cause the weariness in the first place. Here are seven ways to wind up weary:

Waiting on God in Weariness

BIG IDEA | Waiting on God is the only way through weariness.

"Even youths shall faint and be weary, and young men shall fall exhausted; but they who wait for the LORD shall renew their strength..."
Isaiah 40:30-31

"I can't do this anymore..."

"What's the point of this..."

"I think it would be easier to just give up..."

These are the types of thoughts that mark seasons of weariness in our lives. Weariness is the state of physical, emotional, and spiritual depletion. It's a fatigue that extends to every facet of life and remains a reality that all Christians face. The prophet Isaiah meant to make this clear when he pictured the strongest, healthiest, highest capacity person he could and said even they grow weary.

 

Preaching is draining work. A faithful Bible preacher labors week after week to carefully and prayerfully craft sermons in a way that are faithful, helpful, and clear.

All the while they see the faces of actual people God has entrusted to their care. They see their victories, their trials, their suffering, and their sin. They hear their fears, doubts, and their prayers. All of this adds to the weight of bringing a word from God that will build them up, encourage them, feed them, and challenge them.